Insomnia Tea – Creates Good Healing Sleep

Sleep is vital for health and insomnia tea helps. Natural sleep remedies to promote better sleep and treat insomnia have been used by millions for thousands of years. If you have been suffering from a serious lack of restful sleep, give this natural remedy, insomnia tea, a try because sleep is vital for healing. A warm cup of Insomnia tea is a wonderful way to calm from a long day.

 

A cup of insomnia tea will end insomnia, reduce pain and increase health without side effects or addiction

Without Good Sleep Pain Levels Rise.

Relax and drink some Insomnia tea.

Natural Ways to Improve Sleep and Treat Insomnia

As life gets busier it seems that there is no time to sleep. Even when you do grab a few hours, they usually aren’t very restful and leave you feeling just as fatigued as you were before. The sleep crisis facing many children and adults has caused them to become irritable, chronically tired, and even sick due to a compromised immune system.

Sleep is incredibly important for energy, restoring tired systems, and healing the body. In fact, the healing you experience while asleep is much more effective than anything you experience while awake. With this in mind, a lack of sleep or sleep that isn’t restful becomes all the more alarming. Fortunately, there are various natural ways to improve sleep as well as treat insomnia. 

Lifestyle changes can help as well as bedtime insomnia tea.

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Sleep

Healing Sleep - Better Sleep for Pain Free LivingThe Importance of Restful Sleep

Restful sleep is one of the most important parts of life for a number of reasons. Children, teenagers and young adults under twenty-five require restful sleep to aid in their physical and mental development as well to keep their bodies working properly.

For older adults, sleep is important to keep up the immune system as well as help the body to age gracefully and heal when sick or injured. People often sleep after a trauma or ordeal because it is the body’s way of repairing itself after it has been stretched beyond its limits. For the day to day life, sleep is important for keeping up your energy and stamina as well as maintaining a strong immune system to fight disease and other illness.

Restful sleep is defined by deep sleep that may include dreaming, also known as REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. When restful sleep is achieved, you wake up feeling refreshed and energized rather than tired and groggy and can go about your day with renewed enthusiasm.

What is Insomnia?

Insomnia is incredibly common among most people. There are many causes behind it and addressing these is the first step to curing the problem. Insomnia is commonly described as a condition where, despite feelings of fatigue and need for sleep, you cannot fall asleep.

The mind keeps going and you can’t seem to relax enough to induce deep sleep. Many with insomnia find themselves lying awake all night or else falling asleep briefly only to wake up an hour or two later completely wide awake. Sometimes prescription sleep aids will do the trick but there are plenty of natural remedies that won’t be hard on your body and will ensure you’re back to sleeping soundly in just a matter of time.

Natural Remedies for great sleep without addiction or side effects 

  • Melatonin: This naturally occurring hormone helps to regulate your sleep and wake cycle. It is responsible for controlling the timing as well as the body’s drive for sleep by inducing drowsiness, lowering your body temperature, and putting the body into sleep mode.
    Melatonin supplements are available at most stores in a chewable form or pill form. While melatonin is not always proven to help those suffering from insomnia to stay asleep, it has been successful in helping to improve poor sleep. Melatonin works for some people better than others, 
  • Lavender: Lavender oil is a natural sleep aid that helps calm the body and encourage restful sleep. Lavender candles, taking a bath with lavender oil, or simply using lavender lotion can help you wind down and get a good night’s rest.
  • Avoiding Technology: Watching television, surfing the web, or using your smartphone before bed can stimulate the brain and make it harder to get tired. When you watch screens for too long, your mind tends to stay alert and the brain cannot produce the needed amount of melatonin. Even if you turn the television off or put your phone away just before bed, you won’t have enough time to wind down and fall asleep. It is best to avoid using technology for at least an hour before bed to help your body get sleepy naturally.
  • Valerian Root: An ancient sleep aid, valerian root has sedative-like qualities that help get you to become and stay sleepy. It can take a few weeks for valerian root to get you’re your system and really start taking effect. However, after a few weeks, this ancient herbal remedy will help rewire your sleep and wake cycle.
  • Warm Milk: Drinking warm milk before bed can help you to become naturally sleepy. Milk contains calcium that helps the brain create melatonin which is an easier way to produce the necessary hormone to fall asleep.

These natural sleep remedies to promote better sleep and treat insomnia have been used by many people and doctors over the years. If you have been suffering from a serious lack of restful sleep, give these natural remedies and insomnia tea a try.

References

Could melatonin be the cure for sleepless nights?
Bailey Heminger; Daniel J. Sheridan

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Cooper KL, Relton C. Homeopathy for insomnia: a systematic review of research evidence.Sleep Medicine Reviews. 2010;14(5):329–337.

de Niet G, Tiemens B, Lendemeijer B, et al. Music-assisted relaxation to improve sleep quality: meta-analysis. Journal of Advanced Nursing. 2009;65(7):1356–1364.

Ernst E, Lee MS, Choi T-Y. Acupuncture for insomnia? An overview of systematic reviews.European Journal of General Practice. 2011;17(2):116–123.

Ferracioli-Oda E, Qawasmi A, Bloch MH. Meta-analysis: melatonin for the treatment of primary sleep disorders. PLoS One. 2013;8(5):e63773.

Gooneratne NS. Complementary and alternative medicine for sleep disturbances in older adults. Clinics in Geriatric Medicine. 2008;24(1):121–138.

Gross CR, Kreitzer MJ, Reilly-Spong M, et al. Mindfulness-based stress reduction versus pharmacotherapy for chronic primary insomnia: a randomized controlled clinical trial.Explore. 2011;7(2):76–87.

Kierlin L. Sleeping without a pill: nonpharmacologic treatments for insomnia. Journal of Psychiatric Practice. 2008;14(6):403–407.

National Cancer Institute. Aromatherapy and Essential Oils – professionals. National Cancer Institute Website. https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/hp/aromatherapy-pdq#section/all

Ng B-Y, Lee T-S. Hypnotherapy for sleep disorders. Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore. 2008;37(8):683–688.

Oliveira DS, Hachul H, Goto V, et al. Effect of therapeutic massage on insomnia and climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. Climacteric. 2012;15(1):21–29.

Pearson NJ, Johnson LL, Nahin RL. Insomnia, trouble sleeping, and complementary and alternative medicine: analysis of the 2002 National Health Interview Survey Data.Archives of Internal Medicine. 2006;166(16):1775–1782.

Riemersma-van der Lek RF, Swaab DF, Twisk J, et al. Effect of bright light and melatonin on cognitive and noncognitive function in elderly residents of group care facilities: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2008;299(22):2642–2655.

Sarris J, Byrne GJ. A systematic review of insomnia and complementary medicine. Sleep Medicine Reviews. 2011;15(2):99–106.

Siebern AT, Manber R. Insomnia and its effective non-pharmacologic treatment. Medical Clinics of North America. 2010;94(3):581–591.

Taibi DM, Landis CA, Petry H, et al. A systematic review of valerian as a sleep aid: safe but not effective. Sleep Medicine Reviews. 2007;11(3):209–230.

Taibi DM, Vitiello MV. A pilot study of gentle yoga for sleep disturbance in women with osteoarthritis. Sleep Medicine. 2011;12(5):512–517.

Learn more

Insomnia

Sleep disorders

Brain Basics for Sleep

Changing your sleep habits

What is mindfulness?

 

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